Stryker Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some frequently asked questions concerning Stryker hip devices, resulting injuries, and defective product claims.

Which Stryker Hip Devices have been recalled?

On July 6, 2012 Stryker voluntarily recalled its Rejuvenate Modular Hip System and its ABG II Modular-Neck Hip Stem. Both devices were in use since 2008.

I know that I have a Stryker hip implant, but I’m not sure if it’s on the recall list?

Contact your surgeon to find out which Stryker device you have. Also, ask for copies of your medical records to confirm which Stryker hip implant device was used in your case. Some surgeons and hospitals have not informed patients that their implant devices were recalled.

You need this information to protect your health and your legal rights. Don’t become alarmed, especially if you are not experiencing any indications or symptoms of a problem.

You will, however, need all of the facts from your doctor or surgeon. Medical records from your surgery should include product labels that clearly identify the exact make and model of each Stryker hip system (or part) that you may have.

What are the dangers associated with the recalled Stryker devices?

Stryker now admits that some patients who received their hip and knee implants must have it removed and replaced with another device much earlier than originally anticipated. People have reported various problems with the Stryker Rejuvenate Modular Hip System and the Stryker ABG II Modular-Neck Hip Stem, including pain and/or swelling around the hip, difficulty climbing stairs, and difficulty flexing and with range of motion.

What are the potential problems linked to Stryker implants?

Stryker Rejuvenate and Stryker ABG II devices have been linked to severe problems such as metal fretting and corrosion, loosening of the hip implant, metal poisoning, bone fractures, and dislocation. Symptoms such as pain, swelling at the site of the hip implant, and difficulty walking have been reported by patients.

Am I eligible to file a Stryker lawsuit?

If you were implanted with a Stryker hip replacement system and experienced any of the symptoms we shared in the previous two questions, you may be eligible to file a lawsuit.

Do I have a case even if I don’t have symptoms?

Yes.  Patients who received the either Stryker’s Modular Hip System or its ABG II Modular-Neck Hip Stem may not currently exhibit any symptoms. Odds are that someday they will. If you wait until then to seek legal representation, it may be too late.

DC law requires nearly all personal injury lawsuits to be filed within three years of the incident or in realizing that you have suffered injury. If that statute of limitations expires, your opportunity is lost forever. Therefore, if you suspect you have a Stryker implant, you must first contact your doctor to get conformation and copies of your medical records.

Your next step is to call an experienced personal injury lawyer who has handled numerous cases involving product liability and, specifically, Stryker implant cases.

What about Stryker knee implants?

In April 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a Class I recall for the Stryker Orthopaedics – ShapeMatch Cutting Guide, which is used with Stryker’s Triathlon Knee System. The recall applies to the devices that were used and manufactured from May 2011 to November 2012. Class I recalls are the most serious that are issued by the FDA.

I have been asked to establish a claim with Stryker, what do I do?

You are not required to file a claim with Stryker in order to pursue your legal rights. In some cases, Stryker may offer to pay a portion of your medical expenses. However, we know of no Stryker offers to pay the full amount of compensation you may deserve, such as pain and suffering, lost wages and other expenses incurred with hip or knee revision surgery. Only an experienced defective medical device lawyer can work to ensure that your current and future needs are meet.

I need revision surgery, what do I do?

If your doctor says you require revision surgery, contact an experienced personal injury attorney right away and protect not only your full legal rights but also the evidence you will need to present in your civil case. A skilled experienced personal injury attorney will fight Stryker for you, and put your interests first.

I don’t know if I need revision surgery, what do I do?

Contact your doctor first. He can check your records and tell you with little trouble whether you will need revision surgery to replace your defective hip or knee device. If you do, contact a personal injury attorney who has litigated cases involving defective medical devices right away.

By working closely with your doctor and your attorney, you will have better access to all the information that is required to secure the rightful compensation that you deserve. That compensation also serves to motivate Stryker, and companies like it, to use better judgment in releasing products into the market in the future.

Have there been recalls of other Stryker hip replacements besides the Rejuvenate and ABG II models?

Yes. In 2008, Stryker issued a voluntary recall of its Trident ceramic hip implants after patients reported squeaking noises, which medical experts feared could be a sign of future problems not yet realized. It’s important to note these implants have been off the market for almost five years and normal statutes of limitations have likely expired.

However, you should still contact an attorney as some exceptions may apply – such as you were not made aware of the recall by your physician and you did not realize you were suffering adverse effects from the device. Price Benowitz LLP can help you retain the appropriate counsel, call today for a free, initial consultation, (202) 600-9400.