Foreseeable Crimes in DC Negligent Security Cases

Foreseeable crimes in DC negligent security cases mean that an owner is aware of the potential hazards that could occur on their property. For example, foreseeable means that an owner knows that people are dealing drugs on their property, then it is reasonably foreseeable that a fight could break out because people are dealing drugs on the property.

If you would like to better understand the role security plays, speak with a a negligent security attorney right away. Contact a skilled negligent security lawyer about a foreseeable crime can impact your case.

Examples of Foreseeable Crimes in DC Negligent Security Cases

Knowing that there are drunken college kids on the property does not mean they can foresee a gang fight on the property. They have no reason to believe there is going to be a gang fight because there are no gang members coming into the bar.

If an individual knows there has been a stabbing on their property, they have a duty to prevent further gang fights on the property. It defines itself and it is backwards–looking. When something happens on an individual’s premise, they have to take adequate steps to prevent it from happening again.

For instance, if the cops are routinely being called to an individual’s bar because there is rowdiness and arguments at the bar, they need to take steps to prevent that from happening.

Determining Foreseeable or Unforeseeable Offenses

It is made by the judge or the jury. One is not going to know something is foreseeable. It is sort of a smell test. If there are fights on the property, a person could reasonably foresee somebody getting there to fight on the property and the individual needs to protect them for that. If there has never been any incident on the property, it is not reasonably foreseeable that something could happen.

For someone who owns a bar foreseeable crimes in DC negligent security cases could begin with a drunk person dropping a glass. The owner needs to clean it up, because it is foreseeable that someone could fall on a wet floor. They need to take preventative steps, even if there has never been a prior accident, to clean up a wet floor because someone could fall on it.

Whether it is foreseeable is a question of law initially and, alternatively a question of fact if a juror believes that there was a reason for a property owner or a bar operator to foresee a certain danger arising, based on whatever the circumstances where that gave rise to the accident.

Adequate Security Cases

It is uncommon that accurate security plays a role in foreseeable crimes in DC negligent security cases. Someone does not have a claim against the company that is providing security; they have a claim against whoever foreseeably could have prevented the crime. A person also does have a claim against the individual that committed the crime. To the extent they do not have assets, it makes it very difficult to impose liability on a party one thinks should have provided adequate security if they did provide adequate security.